CUYAMACA WOODS

It was a motorcycle adventure ride I will never forget. The meet up breakfast spot was Roscoe’s Chicken & Waffles in Long Beach, California at 8:00am. The 8:00am breakfast did not start on time because we were socializing in the parking lot. We finally walk across the street from the parking lot into Roscoe’s for breakfast at approximately 8:30am.  More motorcycle riders arrived after the 8:00am meet up time to order breakfast. Kickstands up did not happen at 9:00am. We finally leave Long Beach around 9:45am.

Traffic is common on the way to San Diego from Los Angeles County and motorcycle riders have the luxury of splitting lanes. Since traffic was heavier than normal, it was decided at a gas stop we would take California State Route 78 to the private lunch location in Julian.

We ride through the historical Julian district deep into the Cuyamaca Woods on California State Route 79. California State Route 79 is known as a challenge for drivers and motorcycle riders between Interstate 8 and Julian. The higher up the mountain we ride, I immediately notice burnt logs and trees in the Cuyamaca Peak mountain range from the 2003 Cedar Fire. I also notice there are no painted road dividers and no guardrails the higher we ride up the mountains. The uneven roads and falling rocks from the mountains makes it unsafe to make a U-turn. The road through the mountain has many twists and turns, a few hairpin and switchback turns making it difficult to see oncoming vehicles and snakes slithering across the road. Yes, snakes!

We arrive to an electric gate to the Cuyamaca Woods private community. Behind the electric gate is a steep driveway entrance leading to a beautiful home with a panoramic and breathtaking view of the mountains, woods and Lake Cuyamaca and a delicious lunch catered by Taco Rehab.

Another great motorcycle ride with good people, pictures to share and stories to tell for a lifetime!

If you decide to visit Cuyamaca Woods, bring a book to share and take a book to inspire the love of reading and book exchanges around the world.

MESH MOTORCYCLE JACKET IS A MUST HAVE IN THE SUMMER

It’s tempting to ride a motorcycle without safety gear when it’s hot.  Mesh jackets are lightweight and breathable to keep your body cool. Mesh jackets do not offer the most protection during a slide, but they are perfect for riding in warm weather.

Here are some features to look for when shopping for a mesh motorcycle jacket:

1. Safety and Protection – some jackets provide removable CE-Certified and PE foam approved armor in the back, chest, shoulders and elbows to protect during an impact on pavement. It’s important to dress for the ride and slide!

2. Comfort – the armor may not work on impact if the jacket does not fit properly to protect you. Make sure the armor does not move around when you try the jacket on for size. The zippers, snaps and straps should prevent the fabric from flapping around in the wind.

3. Visibility reflectors for others to see you riding in the dark.

4. Windproof and Waterproof Full Sleeve Removable Liner – the windproof/waterproof liner is for light rain. Remember to always carry rain gear even in the summer!

5. Pockets for easy access to the items you need such as keys, debit/credit cards, cash, drivers license and registration.

The Indian Motorcycle Springfield Mesh Jacket is made of polyester with perforation to allow air to flow through the front and back. Velcro straps on the sleeves to reduce flapping in the wind on my arms. The CE rated armor on the elbows and shoulders are easy to remove before washing in mild detergent. The expansion panels on the shoulders provides a comfortable ride for any style of handlebars. The reflective stripes light up at night for visibility to allow other motorcycle riders and drivers to see you riding on the road. The two-way zipper option from top or bottom allows for a flayer at the bottom to provide comfort and relief after a ride to eat!

GAS AND GO ON YOUR MOTORCYCE MAY COME WITH A HEFTY PRICE

The convenience of GAS AND GO on a motorcycle may come with a hefty price if you plan to pay with a debit or credit card.

There is usually a very small sign on the gas pump informing customers your debit or credit card may be pre-authorized for an amount more than the purchase price.


Paying directly at the pump can cost you an additional $1.00 to $150.00 plus hold for days after paying for gas to fill up the tank.

It’s not only embarrassing to hear the cashier say “YOUR CARD IS DECLINED” while standing in a long line to make a purchase, it is also frustrating when YOUR MONEY IS ON HOLD!

Let’s not also forget the scam artist that create skimmers to capture your transaction data from the magnetic strip on the back of your credit or debit card after entering your secret pin numbers at the pump to empty your bank account. Lost or stolen debit and credit cards with a chip are easy to use without proof of identity.

Budget smart for your motorcycle ride:

1. Call your bank before you ride to provide dates, states and countries you plan to travel.
2. Pay for your gas inside to avoid a hold on your money.
3. Have cash on hand.
4. Cash is still King.
5. Pay Inside, Gas and Go!

I LEFT MY COWBOY BOOTS IN A SHOE TREE ON THE LONLIEST HIGHWAY IN AMERICA!!!!

I remember like it was yesterday riding an Indian Roadmaster down U.S. Highway 50 through Nevada as the tail gunner for a pack of female motorcycle riders for the Sisters’ Centennial Motorcycle Ride.

I notice a shoe tree to my right while riding west on U.S. Highway 50 on our way to grab a delicious burger at Old Middlegate Station.  The station served as a Pony Express stop in 1860-1861.  The restaurant is a few miles up the road from the shoe tree.

I inform Gin Sheer, Robin Rimsky and a few other female motorcycle riders during lunch I’ve been riding cross country with an old pair of cowboy boots in my saddle bag that I’d like to toss on a the tree since Indian Motorcycles gave me a brand new pair of Redwing Boots to wear as a sponsored motorcycle rider.

We ride our motorcycles back to the shoe tree after lunch so I can toss my cowboy boots in the tree.

Cowboy boots don’t have shoe strings so Lisa Jackson gives me a zip tie to attach the boots together by the pull straps.

I toss my old raggedy Cowboy boots in the shoe tree on the first try!

Mission accomplished…now I ride home to California with a lighter load.

 

 

WATCH OUT FOR WILD HORSES WHILE RIDING YOUR IRON HORSES IN THE WEST

I noticed on my 18th cross country motorcycle ride an increase of wild horses roaming the open roads and bringing traffic to a complete stop.

A few wild horses crossed my path while riding my motorcycle at a slow speed on twisting roads through the mountains in Carson City, Nevada.

I was able to capture a picture of a couple of wild horses grazing the grass near a Chevron gas station.

Wild horses are protected by Federal law via the Bureau of Land Management and roam free in the western states of Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah and Wyoming.

Nevada is home to 60% of the wild horses in the United States of America

The Bureau of Land Management provides holding facilities to remove excess wild horses to protect rangeland from over-grazing, which is shared with private livestock.

Cattle Ranchers complain the Bureau of Land Management is not managing wild horses because they have increased 150% over the appropriate management level with a growing population of approximately 20% each year.

The Bureau of Land Management reports a decrease of wild horse adoption from 9,000 per year to less than 3,000 per year.  The holding facilities are getting over crowded.  The cost to maintain 50,000 wild horses and burros in holding facilities is more than $43 million per year.

Wild horses can live 25 years or more in captivity.

Please ride your motorcycles with caution in the wind so the wild horses can run unbridled and live free!

Million Dollar Highway

In Colorado between Silverton and Ouray U.S. ROUTE 550 is known as the MILLION DOLLAR HIGHWAY and ONE OF THE DANGEROUS ROADS IN THE WORLD.

I’ll never forget riding a motorcycle on U.S. Route 550 early in the morning through drizzling and sprinkling rain soaking a narrow road with switchbacks and steep hills at high elevation with no guardrails. It was the first time I had three deer to run cross my path while riding a motorcycle and the first time I witnessed deer climb up a steep vertical mountain wall like a mountain goat.

If you decide to ride your motorcycle on U.S. Route 550, keep your eyes on the road, respect the speed limit and stop in Ouray to soak in the Hot Springs!

WINTERIZE YOUR MOTORCYCLE RIDE!

Motorcycles were made to ride in cold weather!

Motorcycle maintenance is essential to assist with avoiding mechanical issues and unforeseen misfortunes. Your motorcycle like your body requires investment of tender loving care to give you satisfactory performance to live for the ride during the winter just like you do in the summer.  The motorcycle manual provides the prescription for motorcycle maintenance by the mileage on the odometer.  It is crucial not to abuse your machine between service appointments and make a habit to inspect your motorcycle before you ride.

Make sure the rubber on your tire can grip the pavement at lower temperatures and if you plan to ride in the snow, on ice or mud consider tires with studs. Check your tires to ensure the pressure inflation is accurate, there is no exposure of wire or metal coming out of the rubber, there are no nails, screws or hole punctures and flat spots because cold tires limit traction.

Check your motorcycle owner’s manual to see if you can use thinner oil during the winter months to improve performance and if you can use antifreeze in the radiator if your motorcycle is liquid cooled. have a water cooled.

You may consider adding a few accessories to your motorcycle such as windshield, hand guards, fairing and lower leg fairings to assist with blocking wind.

Make sure you know how much wattage your motorcycle alternator can handle before you hook up high watt items such as heated motorcycle gear to include vests, jacket liners, pants, gloves, insoles and socks to avoid burns so you can enjoy a warm luxury ride.

The goal is to keep your body warm and prevent heat from escaping from your head, feet and hands. Don’t layer too much to restrict body movement for operating your motorcycle safely. Start with a base layer to cover your body that also absorbs moisture to maintain body temperature throughout the ride. If you do not have a full body suit, be sure to check your motorcycle riding gear for air gaps by making sure you tuck your shirt inside your pants, wear wool socks, wear a neck collar, wear a half mask over your face inside your helmet not only to keep your face warm, but to prevent fogging up your face shield if it’s not fog free for safe visibility and wear gauntlet gloves under the jacket sleeve. Choose a fleece mid layer for warmth and an outer layer that is wind proof.

If you start shaking uncontrollably while riding your motorcycle because you are cold, find a place immediately to run hot water over your hands, sit inside and enjoy a hot cup of tea, coffee or hot chocolate to warm your body.

Roadside motorcycle service comes with restrictions such as limited number of service calls for mechanical breakdowns within a certain time for battery, fuel, keys, flat tire, etc. Towing services are usually for mechanical issues only. For example, if you call to request a tow truck because you are not able to ride your motorcycle through a flooded intersection to get to the gas station for fuel after a rain storm, the company may not provide tow service because there is nothing wrong with your motorcycle.

You are at a greater risk of laying your motorcycle down during the winter because of wild animals and road conditions such as ice, cracks, gravel and salt. Check your motorcycle insurance policy to make sure you have protection in the event of an accident during off season months marked for winter storage or temporary lay-up, which suspends coverage to events related to a collision and your liability.

Plan a safe motorcycle ride, watch the weather forecasts and remember you have nothing to prove.

INDIAN MOTORCYCLE – MY FIRST SPONSOR AS A MOTORCYCLE RIDER

I’m HUMBLED and HONORED to have AMERICA’S FIRST MOTORCYCLE COMPANY – INDIAN MOTORCYCLE to SPONSOR ME for my 9TH ROUND TRIP CROSS COUNTRY MOTORCYCLE RIDE for a total of 18!!!!

I DECIDED 15 YEARS AGO TO RIDE MY MOTORCYCLE 18 TIMES CROSS COUNTRY because my Road Shero BESSIE STRINGFIELD rode her motorcycle EIGHT (8) TIMES solo across the United States of America during the 1930s and 1940s.

My goal was to ride an Indian Motorcycle to break BESSIE’S record because her FIRST MOTORCYCLE WAS A 1928 INDIAN SCOUT prior to owning 27 Harley-Davidson motorcycles.

Bessie’s motorcycle riding routes were not documented unlike the first woman to ride cross country in 1915 Effie Hotchkiss (round trip) and the Van Buren Sisters Adeline and Augusta in 1916 (one way), which is my reason for counting round trips.

I’m forever grateful and thankful for INDIAN MOTORCYCLE making MY DREAM COME TRUE by allowing me the opportunity to ride cross country on the 2016 INDIAN ROADMASTER.

Roll with me…

Thanks for stopping by my page!  Here’s the new blog, where you’ll find stories of my adventures on ground.  Check back often, and be sure to leave a comment.